Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
April 17, 2014, 02:05:28 PM
6103 Posts in 746 Topics by 364 Members
Latest Member: Ben Bryan
Wichita Mountains Climbers Coalition  |  OKLAHOMA CLIMBING  |  Quartz Mountain/Baldy Peak Climbing  |  Devil's canyon 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] 2
Author Topic: Devil's canyon  (Read 5271 times)
Dean

Offline Offline

Posts: 57


View Profile
« on: February 27, 2006, 09:24:57 PM »

So, a friend returned a book on wichita mt hiking that was the first thing i purchased upon moving to OK 10 years ago (the climbing guide was out of print and the refuge closed to climbing as we all know so i was in withdrawal mode). anyway, what's the deal with the so called Devil's canyon located east of the highway at quartz? Is it state land surrounded by private or federal land? One of the state park rangers told me that is was now federal land. This would mean access could be gained.  Does anyone know if the canyon has potential climbing or bouldering? i checked out the topo at the GSCS and it looked promising (yea, for what that is worth). Would it be worthwhile to pursue making it a target for addition to the baldy purchase?  Marion??? Terry, anyone?Huh? Plus it is a new topic- this site is getting pretty darned boring.
Logged
okieterry

Offline Offline

Posts: 551



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2006, 09:22:59 AM »

Although it is on public land, it is land locked by private land owners...many of these who actually shoot tresspassers and/or boil them in large kettles.

If you get past the land owners, good luck!  Then you'll probably be set upon by roaming packs of archeologists and historians, who loathe anyone who might set foot in "their precious".    

  :roll:
Logged
leinosaur

Offline Offline

Posts: 526



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2006, 09:24:10 AM »

I did a google search for "devil's canyon oklahoma" and this was in the middle of the first page on the list:

Quote
IMPORTANT NOTICE !!!!
from the folks at Quartz Mtn State Park
 
Devils Canyon is State Property
 but it is landlocked by private property,
 which you would need to cross
to access the canyon
 
To access Devil's Canyon you have to: get written permission from one of the private property landowners; bring that to Quartz Mtn State Park's office; complete a Devil's Canyon Access permit (so they will know who's in there & when they should come out, in case of accident) then drive to the location you plan on entering and hike in.

 
here's the page, which is about paddling the north fork of the red (which sounds like a fun way to access the canyon)
http://www.okcoutdoornetwork.org/n_fork_r.html



I asked around a while back and heard third-hand that there's a bunch of slabby stuff back in there, a la elk slabs.  Whoever did the exploring didn't sound that interested, but then again even at Elk Slabs there's some real fun shorter stuff here and there.  There's always the chance that it's a red-hot spot being kept a good secret, I guess.  I'd like to check it out but between red tape and kayak lack it hasn't happened.

If you go and explore, be sure and post up, with photos, to break the monotony!
Logged
BASE104

Offline Offline

Posts: 282


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2006, 09:42:35 AM »

Huh.

Terry, I remember everyone always buzzing that that place had some climbing in it. SOMEONE, OU mountaineers, or someone however, snuck in there and said it was just a lot of broken slabby stuff.

Who knows for sure, though? With the discerning eye of today's climbers there could be ten desperate realities in there. Or some killer bouldering.

I have a 16 foot inflatable canoe that I have used in alaska. Three people will fit in it easy, or two with a months' worth of supplies.

If anyone can get permission to "float it," they can borrow my boat. Have paddles and all that jazz. What does it look like with Google Earth?
Logged
leinosaur

Offline Offline

Posts: 526



View Profile
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2006, 10:03:14 AM »

Quote from: "okieterry"


If you get past the land owners, good luck!  Then you'll probably be set upon by roaming packs of archeologists and historians, who loathe anyone who might set foot in "their precious".    

  :roll:


not to mention treasure hunters, eh, Terry?  My personal theory is that Terry's nearly found the gold that the Spanish used to bring from Colorado for a milder wintertime smelt-down in Devil's Canyon - so you might not want to let him know when you're going.  What was that riddle again, Terry?
Logged
JimmyRay

Offline Offline

Posts: 56


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2006, 10:47:19 AM »

Devils Canyon proper is actually an open, wooded/vegetated valley per se, rather than a rocky place (note all the green on the USGS).  The name conjures up all these visions, and relative to rock climbing, one’s first impression probably fails the imagination?

The State Park boundary is more “liberal” toward the southeast, encompassing Boulder Peak, and only skirts the northwestern ramparts of the canyon, those fronting Flat Top Mountain, where all the rocks are.  In general, most forays into the rocks will soon cross over onto private lands.

Regarding the rocks closest to the park boundary, there are at least a couple of “Elk Slabs” in there… big, really nice faces, but angles so low it’s hard to get overtly excited about them.  The main, most obvious face reminded me a lot of a granite-4th Flat Iron (lots of easy 5th Class to 5.6).  High quality, but a scramble for most…
 
The northeast entrance contains a couple of Crab Eyes wannabe pinnacles… very enticing from a distance, but considerably less so when you get up on them (the typical Wichita Mountain optical illusion syndrome)  Being stand-alone features, they are hard to miss… I’ve contemplated going back to pick a couple of lines on these?  There’s also some strange geology in a subsidiary canyon in this area, really strange, weathered (read extremely bad rock), vegetated, teetering, pinnacle-like formations, unlike anything I’ve seen in the Wichita Mountains.  Cool on the eyes, but not as climbing objectives.  While perhaps close to the State Park boundary, all of the aforementioned stuff technically lies on private property.  

As you hike down the canyon, you’ll see a lot of rock, and canyons fronting the Flat Top Mountain side, but it’s a lot like hiking down the Boulder Field in the Charons… lots of rock, but in general, it really doesn’t add up to something that will “knock your socks off”, etc.  As I was looking for Quartz Headwalls, and South American Walls in there, dreaming of getting my opportunity to score ground-up 1979-Quartz-style first ascents, I came away generally disappointed.

Also, to my knowledge, all public land in Devils Canyon is totally encapsulated by private property.  One needs to work through a local to gain access.

I did have BetaBase write-ups on Devils Canyon, but a hard drive crash ate the Quartz section of the guide… when I get them re-written, I’ll post some pictures, etc.

Hope this helps.
Logged
okieterry

Offline Offline

Posts: 551



View Profile
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2006, 11:15:05 AM »

arrrgghhh.....its not the gold i'm after....
Logged
Dean

Offline Offline

Posts: 57


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2006, 07:54:46 PM »

i got chased off a crag once upon a time around Laramie Peak by a rather pissed rancher with a gun.... rather not do that again. But, gold and silver?Huh Na, i'll just buy another lottery ticket and if i win it big i'll buy the place. Hey, maybe that is what the WMCC should do with our dues: buy lottery tickets!!!!
Logged
dayspringgirl

Offline Offline

Posts: 103



View Profile
« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2006, 08:46:27 AM »

The historical society takes a big group out there occasionally to look around and explore.  i think it is just one of the last little places they can hold on to for relics and historical reasons.  the actual "canyon" is park property although the land owners are reluctant to sell a piece for access.  you can legally cross on a propery line - but when they have a gun it is kind of hard to go into the legalities of propery lines.
Logged

we really need only five things on this earth: some food, some sun, some work, some fun, and someone.
okieterry

Offline Offline

Posts: 551



View Profile
« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2006, 09:07:01 AM »

Quote from: "dayspringgirl"
 you can legally cross on a propery line  


WOW!!!  Let me get this straight...are you saying that if you walk a property line....and you don't own property on either side....its legal and you're not tresspassing??

I need the verse, chapter, page, etc. that says this...this has "HUGE" implications...and I'm not talking Devil's Canyon.
Logged
Lefty

Offline Offline

Posts: 146


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2006, 09:50:33 AM »

Devil's canyon isn't worth the effort it takes to get to it. Very dissapointing.

I'm curios about this property line thing. How are you going to know exactly where the property line is? Slackline the barbed-wire fences? How wide is a property line? It seems to me that there is no way you can accurately cross on a property line without tresspassing.
Logged
dayspringgirl

Offline Offline

Posts: 103



View Profile
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2006, 11:12:42 AM »

well i know that the road to cedar valley is a property line to get to there. quartz doesn't own that, but something about road issues and where you can put roads for access.  i am sure marion knows more about this.  staff at quartz showed me the lines where they could put access roads to devils canyon, but it is on a mountain, so no road.  i will find out what this is called and let you know.....
Logged

we really need only five things on this earth: some food, some sun, some work, some fun, and someone.
Dean

Offline Offline

Posts: 57


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2006, 11:23:15 AM »

So, bottom line is: the place probably has limited climbing potential (maybe some slabby easy 5th class stuff?), may have bouldering potential, may have treasure hunting potential (aka thrashing about and getting bit by rattle snakes) and definately has getting shot at potential. Oh well, was worth the try.
Logged
dayspringgirl

Offline Offline

Posts: 103



View Profile
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2006, 11:38:39 AM »

well i looked into the definition of EASEMENT, PUBLIC DOMAIN, etc. and i got some conflicting informatin about access to public lands through private lands.  

terry for your trespassing endevours i wouldn't use it until you have some more specifics, but the access to cedar valley is an easement in which the land owners retain the right to the property under the road, and quartz maintains the road.  as you are running along a fence line - i don't know if that argument would work, but it is a route to explore for access to certain areas.
Logged

we really need only five things on this earth: some food, some sun, some work, some fun, and someone.
Marion

Offline Offline

Posts: 131


View Profile
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2006, 01:34:50 PM »

Under the Organic Act of May 2, 1890, which created the Oklahoma Territory, a right-of-way was reserved along all section lines for use as public roadways.  By statute, there is a process whereby a landowner can have the reservation removed, which results in the section line being "closed".  If a section line has not been closed, it is still considered "open", whether or not a road has ever been built.  By statute, State or County officials may build public roadways along any open section line.  In most instances, that requires certain public notices and hearings.  However, there is a statute that provides for automatic authorization of the building of any road along an open section line leading to a state park.  The road to Cedar Valley at Quartz was authorized based on that statute.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2
« previous next »
    Jump to: